Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Atomic Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker William A Van Wijngaarden photo
Biography:

William A Van Wijngaarden has completed his graduation in 1986 from Princeton University. After spending a year as a Research Associate at Yale University, he joined as the faculty at York University in 1988. Currently, he is working as a Professor of Physics at York University. He is the recipient of several scholarships and awards, including the University of Windsor's Board of Governor's Medal, the 1967 NSERC Graduate Scholarship, the Joseph Henry Scholarship from Princeton University and a considerable number of sizable research grants. Recently, he was chosen to be a member of the NSERC General Physics Grant Selection Committee. His research interests include a variety of topics in pure and applied physics, such as laser isotope separation, laser cooling, atom trapping and environmental monitoring of pollutants, electromagnetically induced transparency for use in optical switching.

Abstract:

High resolution laser spectroscopic measurements of transition frequencies, isotope shifts, etc., are now at a level that they are sensitive to the charge radius of the nucleus. Hence, the recent interest in the discrepancies in the determination of the proton charge radius. A number of experiments have employed novel spectroscopic techniques to measure isotope shifts for several transitions at optical frequencies for the stable and radioactive lithium isotopes. These data offer an important test of theoretical techniques developed by several groups to accurately calculate QED effects and the finite nuclear size in 2 and 3 electron atoms. Theory and experiment have studied several transitions in both Li+ and neutral lithium. The work by multiple groups permits a critical examination of the consistency of separately, the experimental work as well as theory. Combining measured isotope shifts with calculated energy shifts passing these consistency tests, permits the determination of the relative nuclear charge radius with an uncertainty approaching 1x10-18meter. These results are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than those obtained by electron scattering experiments and give insight into the mass and charge distributions of the nuclear constituents.

Keynote Forum

Vladimir Filinov

Joint Institute for High Temperatures-Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Keynote: Quantum simulation of thermodynamic and transport properties of the quark gluon plasma

Time : 10:10-10:50

OMICS International Atomic Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vladimir Filinov photo
Biography:

Vladimr Filinov is a Doctor of Physics &Mathematical Science. He is a Professor at Moscow Power Engineering Institute. He received MSc degree in Physical Optics and also Mathematics from Moscow State University. His research interests are focusing on the correlation effects in strongly coupled quantum Coulomb systems.

Abstract:

For quantum simulations of thermodynamic and transport properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) within a unified approach, we combine Path Integral and Wigner (phase space) formulations of quantum mechanics. Thermodynamic properties of a strongly coupled QGP of constituent quasi-particles are studied by means of color path integral Monte-Carlo simulations (CPIMC). For the purpose of simulations we have presented the QGP partition function in the form of a color path integral with a new relativistic measure instead of the usual Gaussian one used in Feynman and Wiener path integrals. For the integration over the color degree of freedom we have developed a sampling procedure according to the SU(3) Haar measure. It is shown that this method is able to reproduce the available Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) data describing the deconfined phase of QGP. Canonically averaged two-time quantum operator correlation functions and related kinetic coefficients have been calculated according to the quantum Kubo formulas.  In this approach, CPIMC is used not only for the calculation of thermodynamic functions, but also to provide equilibrium initial conditions (i.e. specific coordinates, momenta, spin, flavor and color of quasi-particle configurations) in order to accomplish generation of the color-phase-space trajectories as solutions of related dynamic differential equations. Correlation functions and kinetic coefficients are calculated as averages of related Weyl's symbols of dynamic operators along these trajectories. Using this approach we have calculated the diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity in a good agreement with experimental data.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:50-11:10
  • Experimental Methods | Nuclear Physics | Current Frontiers of Nuclear and Atomic Physics
Location: Chittahoochee
Speaker

Chair

William A Van Wijngaarden

York University, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Xiaodong Li

National University of Defense Technology, P R China

Session Introduction

Doris Jakubassa-Amundsen

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany

Title: On the role of bremsstrahlung in electron-nucleus collisions

Time : 11:10-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Doris Jakubassa-Amundsen has completed her PhD in Natural Sciences from the Technical University of Munich, Germany, and her PhD in Mathematics in 2004 from the LMU University of Munich. She is privatdozent at the Goethe University of Frankfurt, Germany and Research Associate at the LMU University of Munich. His research interests include theory of radiation from ion-atom and electron-nucleus collisions, low-energy nuclear excitation by electron impact, polarization, etc.

Abstract:

A precise knowledge of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung is important for estimating its influence on the electron spectra from nuclear excitation. In coincidence experiments, planned at the S-DALINAC accelerator set-up in Darmstadt (Germany), the photons from electron bremsstrahlung compete with those from 'nuclear bremsstrahlung' resulting from the subsequent decay of the excited nucleus. The sensitivity of such experiments to nuclear structure effects can be increased by measuring, beyond the intensity, the polarization correlations between the projectile electron and the emitted photon. The relativistic partial-wave approach to electron bremsstrahlung is extended to collision energies up to 30 MeV in order to test the validity of the PWBA for heavy nuclei and to extrapolate the extracted PWBA enhancement factors to somewhat higher energies. Our examples include the bremsstrahlung contribution to the excitation spectra from 46MeV e+150Nd collisions, recently measured at the S-DALINAC, as well as predictions for the coincident (e; e0 ) experiments focusing on the 2+ excitation of 92Zr.

Speaker
Biography:

John Morrison received his PhD in Physics from Johns Hopkins University. After working as a Research Associate at the Argonne laboratory, he moved to Sweden where he received a number of grants from the Swedish Research Council to build a research group in theoretical atomic physics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. His research in Sweden led to the publication of the monograph Atomic Many-body Theory, which originally appeared as Volume 13 of the Springer Series on Chemical Physics. The second edition of the book, which was published as Volume 3 of the Springer Series on Atoms and Plasmas, has become a Springer classic. Returning to the United States in 1983, he obtained a faculty position in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Louisville where he continues to carry on research in atomic and molecular physics. The second edition of his recent textbook, “Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers” (Elsevier, 2015), is based on his teaching of modern physics and quantum mechanics at University of Louisville. His research interests include theoretical atomic and molecular physics with applications particularly to astrophysics.

Abstract:

A summary will be given of various approaches that can be used to perform numerical Hartree-Fock method and many-body calculations on atoms and molecules. The theoretical approaches considered include the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method and many-body perturbation theory. For light atoms and molecules, more than 98 percent of the correlation energy is due to pair excitations. Because molecules lack spherical symmetry, Schrodinger-like equations for molecules typically involve many more independent variables. While, the Hartree-Fock equations for atoms involve a single radial variable and the two-electron pair equation for atoms involve two radial variables, the Hartree-Fock equations for diatomic molecules involves two independent variables and the pair equation for diatomic molecules involve five independent variables. To deal with these problems of higher-dimensionality, my mathematical collaborators and I have developed numerical methods for dividing the variable space into smaller sub-regions in which the equations can be solved independently. This domain decomposition theory is described and numerical results are given for Hartree-Fock calculations for diatomic molecules and for numerical solutions of the first-order pair equations which can be used to evaluate the Goldstone diagrams that arise in many-body calculations of molecular spectra. The goal of our calculations is to describe the energy of two helium atoms approaching each other in a cold atomic collision and to obtain the spectral fingerprints of CO and OH molecules in planetary atmospheres.

Xiaodong Li

National University of Defense Technology, P R China

Title: To understand atomic nucleus from a new nuclear structure model

Time : 12:00-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaodong Li received PhD from Universite de Montreal in 1993 and MS from Nankai University in 1981. He is teaching in NUDT as a Professor with the research fields of interest in polymer chemistry, material chemistry and physics. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

To explain some basic facts of atomic nucleus, a nuclear structure model of “ring plus extra nucleon” is proposed. For nuclei larger than 4He inclusive, protons (P’s) and neutrons (N’s) are basically bound alternatively to form a 2ZZ E ring. The ring folds with a “bond angle” of 90˚ for every 3 continuous nucleons to make the nucleons packed densely. Extra N(‘s) can bind to ring-P with the same “bond angle” and “bond distance”. When 2 or more P’s are geometrically available, the extra N tends to be stable. Extra P can bind with ring N in a similar way when the ratio of N/P <1 although the binding is much weaker. Even-Z rings always have superimposed gravity centers of P and N; while for odd-Z rings, both centers of P and N must be eccentric. The eccentricity results in a depression of EB and therefore specific zigzag features of EB/A. This can be well explained by the shift of eccentricity by extra nucleons. Symmetrical center may present in even-Z rings and normal even-even nuclei. While for odd-Z ring, only anti-symmetric center (every P can find an N through the center and vice versa) is possible. Based on this model, a pair of mirror nuclei, PX+nNX and PXNX+n, should be equivalent in packing structure just like black-white photo and the negative film. Therefore, an identical spin and parity was confirmed for hundreds of pairs. In addition, the EB/A difference of all the mirror nuclei pair is very nearly a constant of 0.184n MeV. Many other facts can also be easily understood from this model, such as the nuclear stabilities of isotopes in elements from He to Ne; the stability sequence of 9Be, 10Be, 7Be and 8Be; the neutron halo in neutron-rich nuclides; the general rule for most stable isotopes: odd-Z elements are odd A, even-Z elements are even A; and the highest cohesive energy of Li, Be, B atoms in their own elementary group and so on.

Manish Kumar

Indian Institute of Technology- BHU, India

Title: Atomic energy is the source of power which is another form of electrical energy

Time : 12:25-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Manish Kumar completed his BE in Electrical Engineering from MNNIT, Allahabad, MTech (Energy Studies) and PhD in Plasma Physics from IIT Delhi. He has an experience of more than 12 years in teaching, research and training. His areas of interest in teaching and research are Hybrid Energy System, Optical Fibers, Terahertz Radiation Generation, Photonics, Surface Plasma Waves and Plasma Physics. He has published more than 8 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Advisory Board Member of repute. Presently, he is working on the project “1.5 MW integrated dairy and smart hybrid energy system”. He is an Assistant Professor in Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT (BHU).

 

Abstract:

 

 

Atomic energy is the source of power which is another form of electrical energy. This electrical energy is basically the fundamental energy which is the source of all other energy known to world. We can say that from the prediction of genius Albert Einstein for the unification of forces it is the electrical force that is the root cause of all other forces. When a charge particle moves, it produces magnetic force i.e. electrical energy is converted to magnetic energy and charge particle has only electrical energy only. It is the movement of electrical energy that leads to generation of magnetic energy according to the Maxwell’s law. Since these forces are long range forces so when they follow the Maxwell’s law leads to generation of electromagnetic radiation. The weak and strong nuclear forces discovered which is the cause for binding sub-atomic particles into the nucleus is nothing but the electrical energy being converted into sub-atomic particles due to the conversion of electrical energy into mass with the electrical charge of positive and negative character depending upon the orientation of electrical energy into clockwise or anticlockwise direction. The packing of electrical energy into mass is governed by the anti-law that leads the conversion of mass into energy in the atomic energy given by Einstein’s famous relation E=mc2.

Break: Lunch Break 12:50 - 13:50

Mohamed Hamdi

Sup'Com, Elgazala Technopark, Tunisia

Title: Atomic power and cryptography: opportunities, challenges and achievements

Time : 13:50-14:15

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed Hamdi is the co-authored more than 80 scientific publications published in international journals and conferences. He was the Chair of the 'Cloud security' industry forum in the IEEE ICC'12 conference (Ottawa, Canada). He has also Chaired and co-chaired international conferences and special issues in international conferences. He has presented multiple tutorials and invited speeches in international conferences such as the GEOSS Forum (Globecom 2011). In addition to this he has been invited at the ITU World Telecom conference to serve as a Panellist in a forum on the Security of Social Networks. Between 2001 and 2005, he has worked for the National Digital Certification Agency (Tunisia) where he was the Leader of the Security Risk Management Team.

Abstract:

During the last couple of decades, quantum computing and information processing has been investigated as an alternative to quench the thirst for speed and computing capacity. Even though the quantum computers built so far are able to perform basic calculations (compared to the huge theoretical potential), this field is perceived by the research community as strongly promising to solve crucial issues in the disciplines of computing, cryptography, information theory, mathematics and physics. For example, in the area of cryptography, the substantial potential brought by quantum computing is corroborated by the roadmap established NIST regarding the future development of the underlying technologies.

This talk addresses the opportunities, challenges, and obstacles related to the development of quantum cryptography in the near future. The most important aspects that will be covered include: Quantum cryptography fundamentals: This section will illustrate how harnessing the power of atoms and molecules allow performing memory and processing tasks that are relevant to cryptography; Technological feasibility: Beyond the theoretical understanding of quantum cryptography, the experimental platforms that corroborate the feasibility of quantum-based solutions for cryptographic problems will be covered in this section. For instance, private communication of quantum channels, repeaterless quantum communications, and photonic integrated circuits for quantum communications will be discussed. Moreover, an overview on PQCrypto 2014 will imbue more details to the attendees about the concrete aspects of quantum cryptography.

Quantum-based cryptanalysis: Besides the opportunities behind the use of quantum computing to improve the robustness of cryptographic solutions, the power of atoms presents an important tool that can be used in cryptanalysis. Several attempts did show that currently-used cryptographic algorithms can be broken using quantum computers. Despite the disadvantages of the current solutions in terms of cost-effectiveness, such solutions are expected to proliferate in the near future. Hence, the strategies used to implement quantum-based cryptanalysis will be addressed at this level.

Nicolae A Enaki

Institute of Applied Physics of Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Moldova

Title: Cooperative radiation between blocks of three radiators through single- and two-photon mutual interactions

Time : 14:15-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Nicolae A Enaki was born on 27 May in 1928 in Radenii Vechi, Ungheni, Republic of Moldova. In 1985 he was the Candidate in Physical and Mathematical Sciences (PhD). In 1993 Dr. in Physical and Mathematical Sciences (Dr. habilitatus), Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics: One- and two-photon cooperative phenomena in Optics. From 2002 he was the Professor of Physics of Moldova State University, Chisinau. In 2006 he became Head of Quantum Optics and Kinetic Processes Laboratory, Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldavia.

Abstract:

The three particle cooperative emission consisted from two dipole-active and one dipole-forbidden sub-system of radiators is proposed in the process of interaction through the vacuum or thermal field. It is demonstrate that in such three radiator interaction the collective decay rate becomes proportional to the product of the numbers of radiators in each subsystem: N1 N2 N3. The proposed quantum kinetics takes into consideration single and two photon cooperative exchanges between dipole active and dipole forbidden subsystems of radiators (nuclei, atoms, molecules). The three particle cooperative interaction through the thermal bath and vacuum field takes place during the mutual influences of the single- and two-photon popularization between the pairs of dipole active atoms with the popularization of the dipole forbidden radiator of another ensemble. To describe this effect it is introduced the new correlation functions between the popularization of three radiators belonging to inverted systems of dipole active and dipole forbidden subsystems. The main difference between the Dicke super-fluorescence and new collective effect consists in the establishment of cooperative effect between one dipole-forbidden radiator in two-quantum exchanges with two dipole active radiators. After that the theory is extended to the ensemble of N such three-particle blokes. The cooperative decay rate becomes proportional to the cube of such radiators, N3.

Speaker
Biography:

S L Lebedev graduated from Physical School of Dnepropetrovsk State University, Ukraine. He has completed his PhD from P N Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences. He is Associated Professor and Director of a research team focusing on Quantum Electrodynamics and High Energy Phenomena at Surgut State University (Russian Federation).

Abstract:

The spin radiation effects in the one-particle sector of QED have a twofold origin and could be understood in terms of the Frenkel classical model of “rotating electron”. The imaginary part of the mass shift and the radiation power receive the spin contributions of two kinds. The first one connected with the fermion magnetic moment which constitutes the additional source of the electromagnetic radiation; the contributions of the second kind have the opposite sign and arise owing to the small alteration in the particle acceleration which resulted from the Frenkel addition to the mass of the particle. The contributions of the second kind into above mentioned quantities are dominated over the first one, so giving an explanation to the `wrong` sign of the full spin contributions. We show that not only the sign but the coefficients as well can be explained with the wanted accuracy within classical electrodynamics if one would calculate the spin additions to the mass shift and to the power of radiation with the use of canonical variables. The analysis of Novosibirsk 1984-year experiment on the observation of spin light confirms the unusual dependence of radiation on the spin direction.

  • Poster Presentations
Location: Chittahoochee
Biography:

Nada Elzein Eisa Omer has completed his PhD in Physics in the year 2004 from Gazi University, Turkey. He is an Associate Professor of Physics at University of Dammam. He has published more than twenty (20) research papers both in local and international journals. His research interests are atomic physics, computational physics and quantum physics.

Abstract:

Chemisorption of hydrogen on transition metals has proven great significance in many industrial treatments and processes such as hydrogen storage, corrosion monitoring and controlling and clean fuel production. The simplest chemisorbed species and ideal system to study is the chemisorption of H atom on surfaces. Molecular dynamic method reporting a quasiclassical simulation of the interaction of H2 with Cu13 and Pd13 clusters was reported in this study. Embedded-atom (EA) mode potential was used to define the geometry of the cluster and LEPS (London-Eyring–Polanyi-Sato) potential energy function describe and the interaction between the molecule and cluster. The dissociation adsorption probability of the molecule on the cluster were considered, the roles of initial rovibrational states of the H2 molecule, and the effect of the change of clusters temperature on dissociation were also examined. It was very clear that from the monitored and plotted data, the reaction cross section increase monotonically with increase of initial rovibrational vi, ji sates in the ranges (v=0, j=0; 3; 5; 10) and (v=1; 3, j=0) and that the vibration effect was exerting more influence than that of the rotational in increasing the reaction cross section. It was also seen that the temperature change in the range (295K-300) did not report a significance change in Hydrogen dissociation. The simplicity of the technique and the applicability to practical make it a powerful study for atomistic studies of dissociation of H2 in metallic clusters.

Biography:

Nenad Balaneskovic has completed his PhD from University of Technology Darmstadt. From October 2011 till March 2016, he was a member of a research team focusing on Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Information and Quantum Computation at the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Technology in Darmstadt. His research interests include quantum networks and random unitary operations, quantum Darwinism and the emergence of classicality and numerical application of graph theory.

Abstract:

We discuss characteristic properties of Quantum Darwinism (QD) involving pure decoherence, dissipation and dephasing. In particular, we reconstruct and derive the structure of the corresponding dissipative dephased attractor spaces of our random unitary qubit-model of QD and investigate whether QD appears with respect to evolution based on non-Controlled-NOT (non-CNOT) unitary operations. We identify those attractor space structures that allow the most efficient storage of classical information about a system into its environment. Furthermore, we conclude that CNOT-type unitary operations appear to be well suited copy-machines when it comes to efficiently store the information about a system's pointer basis into the environment.

Biography:

M M Abutalib is an Associate Professor of Nuclear Physics and his research area includes Nanomaterials and Materials Science.

 

Abstract:

The effects of X-ray irradiation on the structural, thermal and optical properties of polyvinyl alcohol–polyethylene glycol–silver (PVA–PEG–Ag) nano-composites have been investigated. The samples of nano-composites were prepared by adding Ag nanoparticles with 5 wt% to the (PVA–PEG) blend. The films of 0.05 mm thickness were prepared by the casting method. These films were irradiated with X-ray doses ranging from 20 to 200 kGy. The resultant effect of X-ray irradiation on the structural properties of PVA–PEG–Ag has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, thermal property studies were carried out using thermogravimetric analysis. Further, the transmission of the PVA–PEG–Ag samples and any color changes were studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed that the crosslinking is the dominant mechanism at the dose range 50–200 kGy. This led to a more compact structure of PVA–PEG–Ag samples which resulted in an improvement in its thermal stability with an increase in the activation energy of thermal decomposition. Moreover, the color intensity ΔE was greatly increased with an increase in the dose and was accompanied by a significant increase in the yellow color component.

Biography:

Asmaa A Hendi has completed her PhD from King Abdulaziz University (KAAU) and Post-doctoral studies from the same university. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a Lecturer and member of several physics associations in Saudi Arabia. She has attended and participated in many national and international conferences. She also attended and participated in many national and international conferences and has received scientific publishing awards.

Abstract:

Nanocrystalline of Cu2O thin film was synthesized by sol–gel spin-coating technique. The spectrophotometric characteristics of transmission and reflection were studied for the film deposited on glass substrate. The optical absorption measurements near the absorption edge indicate that the absorption mechanism is due to allowed direct transition with energy gap value of 2.09eV. The current–voltage characteristics of Al/Cu2O/p-Si/Al diode were studied under dark and various light intensities in the range 20–100mW/cm2. The main diode parameters such as barrier height, ideality factor, series resistance were calculated from the analysis of current–voltage characteristics and studied under various illumination intensities. Moreover, the results indicate that the diode has a high photo-responsivity and the photocurrent increases with increasing light intensity which supports the availability of the diode for photosensor applications. The capacitance and conductance characteristics indicate that the diode highly depends on both voltage and frequency. Higher increase in the capacitance under low frequency as well as the presence of a characteristic peak in the capacitance– frequency characteristics indicates the presence of interface states. Moreover, the stronger parameters of the diode performance such as series resistance and interface states were extracted from the capacitance–voltage–frequency and conductance–voltage–frequency characteristics.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 16:05- 16: 25