Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

M S Pindzola

Auburn University, USA

Keynote: Ion-impact ionization of atoms and molecules

Time : 10:05-10:45

OMICS International Atomic Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker M S Pindzola photo
Biography:

M S Pindzola is a Professor in Department of Physics at Auburn University, a Fellow of the American Physical Society and Institute of Physics, London.

 

Abstract:

A time-dependent close-coupling method has been applied in recent years to the study of ion-impact ionization of atoms and molecules. Although perturbative methods do well in treating ion-impact single ionization of atoms and molecules, non-perturbative methods are needed to make accurate predictions for ion-impact double ionization of atoms and molecules. In our studies of both ion-impact single and double ionization of atoms and molecules, we compare the time-dependent close-coupling results with other theoretical calculations and experimental measurements.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 10:45-11:05

Keynote Forum

Marc H Weber

Washington State University, USA

Keynote: Detecting nothing with anti-electrons

Time : 11:05-11:45

OMICS International Atomic Physics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marc H Weber photo
Biography:

Marc H Weber completed his PhD in “Positrons (antiparticles of electrons) interacting with single crystal surfaces” from City College of City University of New York. He is a Research Professor at Washington State University and has worked on “Positron in atomic physics, high energy physics and materials science”.

 

 

Abstract:

Positrons, the antiparticles to electrons, are ideal probes to detect missing atoms in solids. This has been used successfully to detect open volume from vacancies on up to large voids and mesopores in materials. This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities of positron annihilation spectroscopy as a depth selective probe to observe vacancies and mesopores sizes and size distributions in materials relevant to a broad range of fields. Layers in microelectronics offer the opportunity to lower the dielectric properties of insulators and hence increase the signal propagation speed. Pores and their interconnectivity are vital to filtration, reverse osmosis for food and drug delivery as well as clean water. They are key for catalytic processes in zeolites as well as for ion transport in the operation of batteries. With a mono-energetic beam of positrons, these features can be characterized as a function of depth below the surface down to several 10 s of micrometers, ideal for thin films and layers. On the missing atomic level, positrons are attracted electrostatically to vacancies and vacancy clusters by the small attractive potential formed due to the absence of the positively charged atom core. Measurements are capable of detecting vacancy concentrations at one in one million atoms level. This presentation will focus on the capabilities at the positron beam at Washington State University. Capabilities will be illustrated with a number of examples.

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics | Atomic Collisions
Location: Chittahoochee
Speaker

Chair

Moni Behar

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Speaker

Co-Chair

Xiaoxing Zhang

Wuhan University, P R China

Session Introduction

Moni Behar

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Title: Coulomb heating behavior of fast light diclusters channeled into Si (110) direction

Time : 11:45-12:10

Speaker
Biography:

Moni Behar completed his PhD at the University of Buenos Aires and his Post-doc at the Purdue University (in) USA. He is an Emeritus Professor of the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul and a full Professor of the Department of Physics. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journal and has been Member of the Editorial Board of several journals.

Abstract:

In this presentation, we show data on the Coulomb heating induced by H, B, and C molecular beams channeling along the Si<110> direction. The simultaneous detection of Si K alpha X rays and the corresponding backscattered particles and molecules established the grounds of the determination of the corresponding Coulomb heating. That is the molecular transversal energy due to the Coulomb explosion transferred to the target atoms. The energies used for each ion were for H at 150 keV/atom, for B, it spans a large energy interval between 800 and 2200 keV/atom and finally for C, between 800 and 2400 keV/atom. As a consequence, we have obtained two striking results. First, all the experimental values fall on a straight line when they are plotted as a function of the stored energy per atom, suggesting some kind of “universal behavior”. Second, the analysis of the whole set of experimental data shows that the Coulomb heating scales with 2/3 of the stored potential energy per ion regardless the ion atomic number. The corresponding experimental values are in good agreement when compared with the theory developed for the present case. Finally, we compared the present results with the ones obtained in the Si <100> direction, which were obtained under similar experimental and theoretical conditions. It has shown striking differences between both cases based on the mean charge state obtained in each experiment.

Elena V Orlenko

Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, Russia

Title: Influence of spin-orbit interaction on magnetic properties of fullerenes

Time : 12:10-12:35

Speaker
Biography:

Elena V Orlenko has completed her PhD from St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University. She is full Professor for the Theoretical Physics Department and Director of a research team focusing on spin ordering in the system of identical particles with “high” spins and scattering processes of atomic particles with electron exchange at the Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. Her research interests include magnetic properties of low dimension atomic Bose- and Fermi-gases with “high”-spins of particles, magnetic properties and magnetic ordering in the system of “high” spin particles, exchange and super-exchange interaction in many fold centered atomic systems and developing the formalism of exchange perturbation theory, scattering processes of atomic particles with electron exchange, invariant exchange perturbation theory and super-radiation phenomena of the multi-level atomic systems

Abstract:

The current paper is devoted to the consideration of sp2-carbonaceous fullerenes molecules in homogeneous magnetic field. Due to reduction system symmetry in magnetic field to the axial type, the energy splitting gives rise to forming dominant atomic structures in fullerenes molecule with local symmetries. Spin-orbit interaction plays a crucial role in this phenomenon. The current paper is aimed at determination of such spin-orbit coupling parameters as energy Eso and constant aso as well as g-factors Lande’ for magnetization study of the C60-based compounds in magnetic field. Magnetization study of the C60-based compounds in magnetic field for a wide temperature range demonstrate an amazing feature of its behavior, such as a reduced Lande’ g-factor values g<1. It is shown in experiments a variability of fullerene C60 g-factor in the course of magneto-optical study at pulsed magnetic field up to 32 T in the frequency range ν=60−90 GHz at T=1:8K. There are three values of g-factors: namely: g1 = 0.43±0.03; g2 = 0.27±0.02 and g3=0.19±0.01. Such experiments give rice to assume 1) the availability of existence of three different independent configurations of local spins in the molecule; 2) the influence of the spin-orbit coupling onto forming the Eigen state with determined total angular momentum. There are three dominant symmetric atomic groups of C60-Yh corresponding to the polar point groups (C3v, C3, C2v, C2, Cs, C1), which respond to a magnetic field: 1) a hexagon-faces 2) edges (double bonds, lying on the circle about the direction of magnetic field); 3) vertices (of pentagons, transited about magnetic field direction).

Nenad Balaneskovic

University of Technology Darmstadt, Germany

Title: Random unitary evolution model of dissipation, dephasing and quantum Darwinism

Time : 12:35-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Nenad Balaneskovic has completed his PhD from University of Technology Darmstadt. From October 2011 till March 2016, he was a member of a research team focusing on Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Information and Quantum Computation at the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Technology in Darmstadt. His research interests include quantum networks and random unitary operations, quantum Darwinism and the emergence of classicality and numerical application of graph theory.

Abstract:

We discuss characteristic properties of Quantum Darwinism (QD) when pure decoherence is disturbed by dissipation and dephasing. Based on digraph interaction models of open qubit systems interacting with their respective environment by iterated and randomly applied (controlled-NOT-type) unitary operations, we introduce a unitary two-qubit dissipative-dephased operator. We investigate the QD-appearance of Classicality from the analytically determined asymptotic dynamics of the resulting quantum Markov chain. In addition, we concentrate on interaction digraphs which comprise environmental qubits that do not interact among themselves by unitary quantum operations and are thus suitable to describe physically objective quantum measurements performed on an open system by autonomous observers (environmental qubits). In particular, we investigate whether it is possible to achieve the most efficient storage of classical information about a system into its environment by altering the strength parameters of the dissipative-dephased operator. Furthermore, we discuss the structure of the corresponding dissipative-dephased attractor spaces of our extended qubit-model of QD.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-14:00
Speaker
Biography:

Marc H Weber completed his PhD in 1989 on positrons (antiparticles of electrons) interacting with single crystal surfaces from City College of the City University of New York. He is a Research Professor at Washington State University and has worked on positron in atomic physics, high energy physics and materials science.

Abstract:

Antimatter is the ideal medium for storing energy per mass. Upon annihilation with matter, 100% of the mass is converted to energy. Positron-electron annihilations result in only energetic photons which could be used for propulsion or conventional energy production. Of the three key challenges: Creation of antimatter, conversion to energy, and confinement of large quantities for long times, the latter is paramount for this idea to work. Squeezing like charged particles to high densities requires forces that exceed technical capabilities. An experiment aimed at alleviation of this space-charge challenge is discussed. Rather than storing all charged particles in a single trap of large magnetic and electric fields, an array of micro-traps is used. It features high length-to-diameter aspect ratios and metallic walls. Image potentials in the walls effectively make charges in one micro-trap invisible to charges in any other trap. The electric potential required for axial confinement can be lowered by many orders of magnitude. Ultimately, it is expected to store on the order of 100 billion positrons in 20000 micro-traps in a 50 mm diameter by 100 mm length cylindrical volume. To date, tests with electrons are performed. Confinement up to 1 second has been achieved for a partial trap. The progress and future direction of the experiment will be discussed along with potential uses other than energy storage.

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaoxing Zhang received his Master’s degree from Hubei University of Technology. In 2006, he received PhD from School of Electrical Engineering, Chongqing University. From 2003 to 2013, he worked at Chongqing University as Director of High Voltage laboratory and Associated Director of State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment & System Security and New Technology. In January 2014, he was transferred to work at the School of Electrical Engineering, Wuhan University. He has published 184 papers in domestic and international academic journals and conferences. His research interests include researching on-line monitoring and fault diagnosis for high voltage electrical equipment for a long time. He has introduced advanced nanotechnology to detect SF6 fault characteristic gases and successfully synthesized highly sensitive and selective nano-sensors.        

Abstract:

Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) insulating gas possesses outstanding arc quenching and insulation performance, which is the most, used filled gas in gas-insulated equipment, such as gas-insulated switchgear (GIS), gas-insulated lines (GIL), gas circuit breaker (GCB). However, SF6 gas will inevitably decompose to components (SO2, H2S, SOF2, SO2F2 and CF4 et. al.) under partial discharge and disruptive discharge (surface flashover and creeping discharge) due to the occurred insulation defects in production and long term operation process. The decomposition of SF6, which significantly reduces the dielectric strength of SF6 insulted equipment, may eventually lead to the breakdown of insulation equipment and even paralyze the whole power supply system. Therefore, detecting the insulation status becomes indispensable in an attempt to ensure the running stability of insulation equipment. Basing on current high sensitive chemi-resistor detection method, the insulation status of SF6-insulated equipment can be monitored on-line in real time through detecting the decomposition components: SO2, H2S, SOF2 and SO2F2. This study introduces the research progress of gas sensors using different materials such as modi-TiO2 nanotubes, single wall carbon nano-tube and polyaniline thin-film. In order to understand to detection mechanism, the adsorption properties for gas molecules of decomposition components on the surface of gas sensitive material are studied based on the Dmol3 module of Materials Studio. In addition, the sensitivity and selectivity of prepared gas sensor to different decomposition components are studied under different pressures, concentration and temperature.

Speaker
Biography:

Norimichi Kojima has completed his PhD from Kyoto University, Japan. In 1994, he was appointed as a full Professor, and the Vice-President between 2009 and 2011, the University of Tokyo, and became the Emeritus Professor in 2015. After retiring from the University of Tokyo, he moved to Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, as a fellow. His current interests include the electronic and structural properties of nanoparticles by means of Mössbauer Spectroscopy.

Abstract:

The evolution of geometrical structures of thiolate (SR)-protected gold clusters, Au n(SR)m, in a n=10-55 size range, was studied by means of 197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy. Successful analysis of the Au25 (SR)18 spectrum, based on the crystallographically determined structure, enabled us to estimate quantitatively the numbers of gold atoms coordinated by different numbers (0, 1, and 2) of SR ligands for all the Aun(SR)m clusters. In Au10(SR)10, all the gold atoms are bonded to SR ligands, indicating –Au–S(R)– cyclic structures. A catenane structure was proposed for Au10 (SR)10. At n = 15, gold atoms bonded to a single SR ligand appeared, suggesting the formation of small clusters. At n = 25, a single Au atom without the SR ligation appeared, consistent with the formation of an icosahedral Au13 core protected by six staples, –S(R)–[Au–S(R)–]2. At n = 39, the number of Au atoms without the SR ligation increases from one to two, and the 197Au Mössbauer spectrum is consistent with the face-fused bi-icosahedral Au23 core. These results demonstrate that 197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy will provide detailed information on the structures of thiolate-protected gold clusters whose single crystals are difficult to make.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 15:40-16:00

Eugene Oks

Auburn University, USA

Title: Counter-intuitive results in atomic and molecular physics

Time : 16:00-16:30

Speaker
Biography:

Eugene Oks received his PhD from the Moscow Institute of Science and Technology, and later the highest degree of Doctor of Sciences from the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. He worked in Moscow (USSR) as the Head of a research unit (Center for Studying Surfaces and Vacuum), then – at Ruhr-University-Bochum (Germany) as the Invited Professor, and for the last 26 years – at the Physics Department of the Auburn University (USA) in the position of Professor. His research areas: Atomic/molecular physics, plasma physics, laser physics, nonlinear dynamics, and astrophysics. He founded/co-founded and developed new research fields: Intra-Stark spectroscopy, microwave “lasing” without inversion, quantum chaos. He developed a large number of advanced spectroscopic methods for diagnosing various laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. He published over 300 papers and 4 books. He is the Chief Editor of the journal “International Review of Atomic and Molecular Physics”, a member of the Editorial Boards of the two other journals (International Journal of Spectroscopy and Open Journal of Microphysics), a member of the International Program Committees of the two conferences (Spectral Line Shapes and Zvenigorod Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion).

Abstract:

The talk presents the following counterintuitive theoretical results breaking several paradigms of quantum mechanics and providing alternative interpretations of some important phenomena in atomic and molecular physics. 1) Singular solutions of the Schrödinger and Dirac equations should not have been always rejected. They can explain the experimental high-energy tail of the linear momentum distribution in the ground state of hydrogenic atoms. This is a unique way to test intimate details of the nuclear structure by performing atomic (rather than nuclear) experiments and calculations. 2) Charge exchange is not really an inherently quantal phenomenon, but rather has classical roots. It also has application in continuum lowering in plasmas. 3) The most challenging problem of classical physics that led to the development of quantum mechanics is the failure to explain the stability of atoms which can be solved within a classical formalism that has its roots in Dirac’s works. The result is the appearance of classical non-radiating states coinciding with the corresponding quantal stationary states. The underlying physics can be interpreted as a non-Einsteinian time dilation. It is also an advanced classical description of electronic degrees of freedom in chemical physics.

Elena V Orlenko

Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, Russia

Title: Positron scattering by lithium atom with electron exchange

Time : 16:30-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Elena V Orlenko has completed her PhD from St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University. She is a Full Professor in Theoretical Physics Department and Director of a research team focusing on “Spin ordering in the system of identical particles with high spins and scattering processes of atomic particles with electron exchange” at Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University.

Abstract:

We present the formalism of Time-dependent Exchange Perturbation Theory (TDEPT) built to all orders of perturbation, for the arbitrary time dependency of perturbation. The theory takes into account the rearrangement of electrons among centers. The elements of the scattering S-matrix and transitions T-matrix and the formula for the electron scattering differential cross section are derived. The application of the theory to scattering and collision problems is discussed as an example of positron scattering on a lithium atom, calculating the differential and total cross-sections. The strength of the interaction between particles during collisions is described by a scattering cross-section, or by an effective cross-section. We consider the collision associated with the redistribution of electrons, as the collisions of positrons with neutral atoms accompanied by charge transfer. The obtained matrix element contains the exchange integrals. These integrals take into account the permutations of the electrons between the centers (Li and positron). The signs of these integrals are defined by the Young diagrams and depend on the total spin value. At a simulated differential cross section as a function of the scattering angle at different energies of the incident positron, one can observe regions of a “twisted ridge” for certain values of wave vector k and a scattering angle θ. It has been previously reported that under similar conditions, when an alpha-particle is colliding with a lithium atom, the differential cross-section has a smooth appearance without ridges. The same “twisted ridge” were theoretically predicted for the scattering of proton by lithium atom, for other values of vector k and angle θ.

Natig Atakishiyev

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México

Title: On spl (5, 5) super-symmetric Eigen vectors of the 5D discrete Fourier transform

Time : 16:55-17:20

Speaker
Biography:

Natig Atakishiyev has completed his first Doctoral degree (Candidate of Physical and Mathematical Sciences) in 1971 from Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Russia, and second one (Doctor of Physical and Mathematical Sciences) in 1987 from N. N. Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine. He is a Researcher (Investigador Titular C) in Mathematical Physics from Instituto de Matemáticas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. His research interests include algebraic approach to different equations and operators; special functions and orthogonal polynomials, their group-theoretic interpretation; integral and discrete Fourier transforms.

Abstract:

An explicit form of a discrete analogue of the quantum number operator is constructed in terms of the different lowering and raising operators that govern Eigen vectors of the 5D discrete (finite) Fourier transform. This discrete number operator has distinct Eigen values, which are employed to systematically classify Eigen vectors of the 5D discrete Fourier transform, thus avoiding the ambiguity caused by the well-known degeneracy of the Eigen values of the latter operator. It is found that the hidden symmetry of the discrete number operator manifests itself in the form of the Lie super algebra spl (5, 5).